Lore-and-Saga Living history services and resources for schools, museums and heritage sites. Viking and Roman in school sessions and craft demonstrations. teachers notes and worksheets. Vikings, Saxons, Romans, national curriculum, invaders and settlers, key stage 2, history, teachers information, living history interpreter, in school sessions, storytelling, Roman resources, educational presentations, Viking lore, runes, Roman lore, Viking saga, living history interpretation, Viking resources, Odin, Viking crafts demonstrations, Roman cookery display, Viking silverwork, Roman games, chronology, Viking games, Roman school visits, Viking runes, national curriculum history key stage two, Viking school visits
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Boneworking

Bone, antler and ivory were used for a wide range of practical and decorative uses. Each material has it’s own distinct properties which the Viking and Saxon craftsmen understood well.

Combs were usually made of antler which is strongest along it’s length. For this reason the teeth were cut from narrow plates, these were then riveted together with long decorated side panels to complete the comb.

Reproductions of Viking style bone and antler artefacts
Viking boneworking display

Antler was also the best material for needles and small items like tweezers that needed some flexibility.

Bone was more plentiful, being surplus from meat production, but was less strong. Larger surfaces were available from shoulder blades and since the long bones were hollow small boxes and containers were often made from bone.

Ivory was available from walrus tusks and whale teeth.  There is also evidence that elephant ivory was sometimes used for precious works. The great advantage of ivory for the ancient carver was the thickness of the material and the beauty of finish possible.

The tools for working bone were simple and readily available. Knives, files, saws, awls and scribers were almost all that were needed to produce the finely decorated artefacts that can be seen in many of our museums.

The final ingredient for this type of work is perhaps these days the rarest.  Patience! The amount of work involved in making a comb for instance is hard to imagine unless you set about such a task yourself. The level of craftsmanship displayed in some of our museums is absolutely astounding.

For details of other Craft and Living History Demonstrations click here.2

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Lore-and-Saga Living history services and resources for schools, museums and heritage sites. Viking and Roman in school sessions and craft demonstrations. teachers notes and worksheets. Vikings, Saxons, Romans, national curriculum, invaders and settlers, key stage 2, history, teachers information, living history interpreter, in school sessions, storytelling, Roman resources, educational presentations, Viking lore, runes, Roman lore, Viking saga, living history interpretation, Viking resources, Odin, Viking crafts demonstrations, Roman cookery display, Viking silverwork, Roman games, chronology, Viking games, Roman school visits, Viking runes, national curriculum history key stage two, Viking school visits
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